Newsletters I Depend On For My Research Reading

“If you aren’t having fun creating content, you’re doing it wrong.”

Ann Handley, Digital marketing pioneer, writer, speaker
Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

I’ve already shared some of my favorite books and podcasts for 2021 in previous posts. So I thought that I would include some information on my go-to newsletters to keep me informed and help me learn about technology and the health care industry in general. It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer number of subscription newsletters out there today. So, after eighteen months of research and reading, here are the subscription newsletters that I find invaluable in my research.

Medical Imaging

Having spent over forty years of my professional career in the medical imaging industry, I am still interested in technology, care delivery, and informatics in that area. I’ve found several newsletters that I regularly read to keep me updated.

This excellent newsletter is my first read twice every week. Jake Fishman, the Editor, does a terrific job curating and delivering all the essential imaging news in a highly readable and enjoyable newsletter. Every issue is jam-packed with product announcements, interviews with industry executives, and clinical use-cases for all modalities. Great industry connections, comprehensive reporting, and timely information make this a must-read for anyone interested in medical imaging. These folks do it right. They never bury the lede, let me know enough up-front to determine whether the story is interesting, and distill the information into the key takeaways. Subscribe to this one. They also have a great show on their YouTube channel. Here’s a link to their latest video: https://youtu.be/GNmA7MHj2P4

AuntMinnie.com is the 800lb gorilla of radiology and medical imaging websites. Broad industry coverage with individual newsletter subscriptions for every modality, AI, and Informatics mean this is another critical resource for staying on top of what’s happening in medical imaging. Brian Casey, Editor, and a team of writers provide extensive coverage every week.


Digital Health

There are dozens of subscription newsletters that cover the digital health landscape. They vary in scope, coverage, and frequency. But these are the ones that I read regularly.

Brought to you by the team who publishes The Imaging Wire, The Digital Health-Wire is, for my money, the best way to stay current on all things digital in health care. Published twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays, I love these quick, digestible insights that not only keep me informed but also provide the appropriate context to understand the importance to care delivery.

The Medical Futurist – Dr. Bertalan Mesko and his team at The Medical Futurist Institute have been quoted extensively in this blog since I started writing. I’ve found their future-focused approach to reporting on digital health technologies a tremendous resource that helps me expand my thinking and outlook on how digital health can improve care delivery. Their weekly newsletter summarizes their research, posts, videos, and publications. I spend a lot of time on their website and purchase every e-book they’ve published—a great resource.

STAT Health Tech is another of my favorite weekly reads. These folks cover a lot of ground tracking how tech is transforming health care and the life sciences. Rick Berke, Co-founder and Executive Editor has put together an impressive team of reporters that provide detailed coverage on all things health tech. All I have to see is the by-line, and I know I’m in for an interesting read. Some of my favorites include Matthew Herper, Katie Sheridan, Helen Branswell (who’s done outstanding reporting on the COVID-19 pandemic), Katie Palmer, and Casey Ross. Another must-read newsletter.

The Future of Health & Medicine News is authored by Daniel Kraft, M.D., Founder & Chair, Exponential Medicine Faculty, Chair for Medicine, Singularity University. Covering the future of connected care, synthetic biology, and biomedicine, this newsletter leverages the resources Dr. Kraft brings from the Exponential Medicine conference and Singularity University to report on future trends across the spectrum. Between The Medical Futurist and Dr. Kraft, I get a great range of ideas about the future of health care.


General technology

I always think it is good to cast a wide net when looking for newsletters on technology since many early tech developments will find real-world applications on the front lines of health care delivery. So, these are the essential newsletters that I subscribe to and read regularly.

The Futureloop newsletter is a counterbalance to the algorithmically driven content feeds we’re used to getting. Using Avatar Intelligence, Futureloop has virtualized the minds of futurists Ray Kurzweil and Peter Diamandis. Every 15 minutes, their avatars analyze half a million web pages to help you see the signal through the noise. Futureloop’s “Core Feed” can be prioritized to surface content about your specific industry or interests. By voting articles up or down, the selections delivered more closely match my research interests. An interesting concept, very well executed

The Download from MIT Technology Review is published daily and brings the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s high-impact research, interesting people, and distinctive culture to your inbox. This newsletter gets me the broadest coverage on emerging technologies across all industry sectors. And hey, it’s MIT…..

From the team at Business Insider, Insider Healthcare (subscription required) is an excellent general-purpose option for keeping track of significant trends in health care. Extensive coverage on every aspect of the health care industry. This one is a paid subscription but well worth the investment in time and money from my perspective.


I hope these recommendations are helpful and provide options that you might not be currently reading. If there are others that you subscribe to, drop a comment below. I’m always looking for more resources to learn from. Thanks for reading!

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